Safety and Security Programs: Four - Step Safety and Security Management Method

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Because the safety and security needs of different hospitality organizations vary
so widely, it is difficult to provide one all - purpose step - by - step list of activities
that should be implemented to minimize the chances of accident, injury, or loss.
That said, from a legal perspective your basic obligation is to act responsibly in the
face of threats to people and property. One way to analyze and respond to those
responsibilities is illustrated by a four - step safety and security management method
presented in Figure 1 .

Figure 1. Four-step safety and security management method.

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4-29-2009 05:49

Recognition of Threat
Safety and security programs generally start with the recognition of a need, that is,
a realization that a threat to people or property exists. Consider the case of Garth
Rivers. Garth is the manager of a popular pizza parlor that also serves beer and
wine. Over the past six months, Garth has had four guests and two employees
complain of vandalism to their cars. The damage ranged from scratched paint to
broken windows, and in it least one case, it appeared that the vandals attempted
to break into the car. Before these six incidents, Garth never had a problem. Now,
however, he realizes that he must act responsibly to serve the interests of his guests
and employees, and protect their property. A need for security has surfaced.
Figure 2 lists the most common areas of security concern in the hospitality
industry. The list is not intended to be exhaustive, but it does give some indication
of the vast number of areas within a facility that must be considered when developing
an overall safety and security program. Note the five major areas into which this
list is divided: guests, employees, property, facility assets, and crisis situations.

Figure 2 Areas of safety and security concern.

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4-29-2009 05:50

Program Development
Once a threat to safety or security has been identified, managers and security personnel
can develop an appropriate response to address that threat. Figure 3
details the many different components of an effective hotel safety and security
program, which would have to be addressed by management. Responses, or programs,
can take a variety of forms including:

1. Training for threat prevention
.
In many cases, the proper response to a safety and security threat is proper
training for employees. If, for example, employee safety is threatened
by a large number of back injuries caused by the use of improper lifting
techniques, training employees in proper lifting techniques could reduce
or eliminate that threat. Other examples include training room attendants
in the proper manner for disposing of bloody items found in rooms, teaching
cooks the proper way to use a meat slicer, or instructing employees and
guests in what should be done in the event of a fire emergency.

2. Increased surveillance and/or patrol
.
In some cases, the best response to a threat simply involves monitoring
the activities in a particular area with greater frequency. In the parking lot
problem just described, one of Garth ’ s best responses could be to increase
surveillance of the parking lot of his pizza parlor. Routine patrols carried out
by management, employees, an outside security firm, or the police may serve
as a significant deterrent to vandals.
Other safety and security threats can be addressed by installing video
cameras in public areas to record activity. Stairwells, halls, and storerooms
are appropriate areas for the installation of these devices. In many cases, the
presence of the camera itself can help deter crime. Video camera systems
can either record action to tape or simply display the activity of a specific
area in real time, with no recording of the events. In all cases, however, if a
camera is installed to view a specific problem area in a hospitality organization,
then that camera must be adequately monitored. Many organizations
have actually chosen to forgo the use of video cameras as a guest - safety tool
if they cannot be monitored, because the presence of the camera could give
the guest a false sense of security.
It is important to understand that an owner ’ s right to unlimited monitoring
and surveillance, even on his or her own property, is not absolute. In
today ’ s computer age, illegally monitoring the behavior of guests, and especially
that of employees, can dramatically increase an employer ’ s liability.

Figure 3 Elements of a hotel security program.

Download (8.56 KB)

4-29-2009 05:54

3. Systematic inspections
.
In some cases, holding a routine and comprehensive inspection of facilities
can help identify possible threats to safety and security. As a professional
hospitality manager, you will be expected to carefully monitor your facility ’ s
compliance with accepted standards of a safe and secure operation. It is important
that you not only regularly monitor your facility for compliance but also
document your efforts. Figure 4 is an example of a checklist that can be
used to do both: monitor compliance and document the effort. Many sophisticated
travel agency companies concerned about the safety of their clients,
as well as corporations concerned about the safety of their employees, have
developed their own safety and security checklists. As a manager, these can be
very instructive because they let you know what travel agents feel is important
in a facility they would recommend to their clients.

4. Modification of facilities
.
When the facility itself contributes to a threatening situation, that facility
may require modification. For example, worn carpets should be replaced
before a guest falls; sidewalk curbs should be painted if they are not visible
to pedestrians; and extra lighting might have to be added in specific areas to
increase safety and security. It is important to remember that facility defects
that have been recognized or should have been foreseen by management,
but not corrected, can be very damaging in the event of a lawsuit.

5. Establishing standard procedures
.
Routine policies and procedures can also serve as an effective response to
threats to safety and security. Consider the case of the hotel that offers guests
the use of a safety deposit box. Obviously, procedures should be in place to
ensure the security of the items placed on deposit with the hotel. In a similar
way, a restaurant must have appropriate procedures in place for counting and
depositing the cash it takes in on a daily basis. Periodic product inventories,
plate counts on buffet meals, and signing in and out of management keys are
all examples of standard operating procedures that directly impact the safety
and security of an operation.

Figure 4. Safety and security checklist.
(See Download Space: http://www.hotelmule.com/?uid-68-action-viewspace-itemid-1598[/url])

ANALYZE THE SITUATION
THE COMMODORE HOTEL was owned by the First Community Insurance Company,
and managed by Fieldstone Hospitality Management. After two separate guest
assaults occurred inside the hotel rooms, Fieldstone Management approached
First Community Insurance with the idea of either installing a closed circuit
video camera (CCVC) system in all hallways or increasing the lighting levels of
the hotel’s corridors. First Community Insurance authorized Fieldstone Management
to purchase a video surveillance system consisting of six cameras and
a central location to view them. The events shown by the cameras were not
committed to tape.
Late on the evening of February 6, Mrs. Cynthia Larson checked into the
Commodore and was assigned a room at the end of one of the hotel’s corridors.
As she attempted to insert her electronic key into the door lock, she was
assaulted.
Mrs. Larson sued both Fieldstone Management and First Community
Insurance, claiming that both companies’ failure to monitor their cameras was
a direct cause of her assault. In addition, she claimed that the cameras’ use was
deceptive, in that it gave her a false sense of security. As she stated, “The cameras
showed me the hotel cared about my security, and I wanted to stay in a
safe location.” According to timesheets provided under subpoena by the hotel,
an employee was assigned to view the cameras in the central location for an
average of two hours per night between the hours of 8:00 P.M. and 6:00 A.M.
The assault occurred at a time when no employee was monitoring the cameras.
The attorney for First Community Insurance stated that the company was
merely the owner of the hotel and not responsible for day-to-day management;
thus, is should not be held responsible for Mrs. Larson’s injuries. Fieldstone
Management maintained that it too should not be held responsible just
because the cameras installed were not monitored at all times. The presence
of the cameras themselves and electronic locks on their doors demonstrated
that the company used reasonable care in the protection of its guests.
1. Will First Community Insurance be held partially responsible for the
actions of Fieldstone Management?
2. Did Fieldstone Management use reasonable care in the installation and
operation of the camera system? Would it matter if the cameras were
recording to tape?
3. What could the hotel owners do in the future to help avoid a similar situation
with a guest?

Program Implementation
Once a hospitality firm has identified the threats to its operation, and designed a
safety and security program that addresses those threats, it must put the program
into action. Large hospitality facilities may have individuals specifically designated
for these tasks, while in smaller properties every employee may have implementation
responsibilities. Both large and small properties may find the need for temporary
or longer - term security assistance, which may be provided by a security guard
company. In all cases, local law enforcement officials should be a vital component
of a property ’ s safety and security program.

Safety and Security Departments

In a large hospitality facility, a safety and security department may exist. The department
head would ordinarily report to the general manager of the facility. Staff
members in the department would be responsible for routine duties such as patrolling
the facility for unauthorized people or suspicious activity, performing inspections,
assisting the police with crime reports, and serving as a liaison with insurance
carriers. In addition, the department might advise the general manager on topics
related to safety and security. The Educational Institute of the American Hotel and
Motel Association offers an excellent certification program for members of a safety
and security department.

Safety and Security Guards

If yours is a small facility, you may decide that it makes sense to contract with a
security guard company to hire a guard to implement all or a portion of your safety
and security program. Consider the case of Teddy Ross. Teddy manages a resort that
includes lodging, foodservice, and entertainment facilities. Teddy decides to renovate
his 200 hotel rooms. All of the furniture for the renovation is to be delivered
to Teddy ’ s facility at the same time, but it will be stored in tractor - trailers in his
parking lot until the building contractor finishes the room renovation. The process
is expected to take 10 weeks, with 20 rooms per week being furnished from the
items in the trailers. Because Teddy does not have the extra staff required to guard
the trailers at night, it might make good economic sense for him to contract with a
security company that could provide such a guard.
Generally it is the role of the security guard to:
1. Monitor the facility.
2. Report observations to management or the police if needed.
3. Intervene only if it can be done safely or to protect the life of a guest or
employee.
4. Record activities and findings.

Security guards are an excellent choice when additional help is needed, for
example, in the event of a large party or whenever management expects that additional
safety or security protection is warranted. They are not, however, a substitute
for a comprehensive and ongoing safety and security program. If such guards are to
be used, it is a good idea to insist that the security guard company:
1. Provide an acceptable indemnity/hold - harmless agreement.
2. Supply proof of liability insurance that names your operation as an additional
insured.
3. Demonstrate proof that it carries workers ’ compensation insurance.
4. Supply a copy of its hiring standards/procedures.
5. Draw up a written agreement detailing the specific services it will provide.

Safety Committees

Many managers find that property safety committees can play a valuable role in the
identification and correction of safety and security problem areas. Ideally, a safety
committee should consist of members from each of a property ’ s departments. For
example, a large restaurant might have members from the preproduction, production,
and clean - up areas in the back of the house, and bartenders, servers, and
hosts in the front of the house. A hotel ’ s safety committee might have one or more
members from housekeeping, laundry, maintenance, food and beverage, front desk,
guest services, and the administrative offices.
Once a committee is established, regular meetings should be scheduled on a
weekly, biweekly, or monthly basis. The meetings need not be long; typically, one
hour is sufficient. An agenda for a property - level safety and security committee
meeting might include:

Safety or security instruction : Training videos, new policies and
procedures, and related instruction can be presented. It is critical that the
committee members see their role as that of a teacher, not just a police
officer, because a worker ’ s peers can often best reinforce the dissemination
of important safety and security information.

Review of safety concerns : Members should be informed of the actions
that were taken in response to safety and security concerns raised in prior
meetings. If, for example, a member of the dishwashing crew expressed
concern in a previous meeting that the chemical sanitizer in the automatic
dispenser was not working properly, he or she should be informed of the
actions that have been taken to correct the problem. In addition, any new
concerns of the group should be discussed at this time, with each department
having an opportunity to contribute. Suggestions, corrections, and
improvements to the property ’ s safety and security programs should all be
encouraged.

Effectiveness report by manager : If accidents have decreased, committee
members should be made aware of that fact. If accidents have
increased, that too should be shared. The meeting is also a good time to let
committee members know how important you consider their contribution
to the overall success of your facility.
The most significant resource you have for reducing safety and security liability
is the commitment of your staff. Safety committees are an exemplary way to demonstrate
your own safety and security commitment, and an excellent way to utilize
your staff ’ s eyes, ears, and ideas for the betterment of your operation.

Law Enforcement Relationships

In addition to your own staff, local law enforcement officials are an important part
of any safety and security effort. Establishing and maintaining a good working relationship
with them is an integral part of your job. Law enforcement organizations
can interact with your business in a variety of ways, including:

1. Regularly scheduled meetings.
It is a good idea to meet on a regular basis with the chief law enforcement
official in your area. This can be a time of sharing mutual concerns and
ideas for support. If the time comes that you need the help of your local law
enforcement department, a personal working relationship with them is a
tremendous asset in resolving any difficulties quickly and efficiently.

2. Neighborhood business watch programs.
These programs involve business owners who report any suspicious individuals
or activities encountered within their place of business.

3. Property safety and security reviews.
Many law enforcement officials will conduct a courtesy “ walk - through ” of
your property to help detect possible security threats or problems, and offer
suggestions for improvement. Because the police are familiar with the difficulties
encountered by other businesses, they are in a unique position to point
out problems you may have but might not easily recognize. In most cases, law
enforcement officials are quite willing to identify areas for improvement.

4. Interdiction programs.
These special programs involve law enforcement officers who are assigned
to a specific area of crime prevention. In many communities, drug enforcement
and other officials create interdiction programs that allow hospitality
managers and employees to inform members of the interdiction team in
the event that they observe specific behaviors previously identified by the
interdiction team. When you make a call to an interdiction program, you are
calling as a concerned citizen, not as a police agent. By working together,
hospitality organizations and police officials can help prevent crimes and
look out for the safety interests of their customers and their business.

5. Training programs.
Some police departments offer training programs for crime detection and
deterrence. These classes are usually offered free of charge or at very little
cost, and can be attended by management and staff employees alike. Many
police departments have a variety of training programs that cover topics such
as personal safety, preventing employee theft, credit card fraud, identifying
counterfeit money, and detecting drug trafficking.

Monitoring Program Results
If a safety program is not working — that is, if it is not reducing or eliminating the
threats to people or property you have identified — then the program must be
reviewed for modification. Consider the case of Dave Berger. Dave is a regional
manager for a chain of 30 delicatessens. The restaurants serve sandwiches and
homemade soups. While reviewing his stores ’ performance, Dave noticed that
each store averaged three critical sanitation violations per health inspector visit. In
response to this, Dave purchased a food safety video and required each store manager
to view it. Six months later, the number of sanitation violations reported per
store remained unchanged. From this information, Dave learns that he will have to
do more than show a video to ensure food safety in his stores.
Legally, you are in a much stronger position if you can document not only that
you have a safety and security program, but also that the program has proven effective.
There are a variety of ways to measure your program ’ s effectiveness. Some
tangible measurements include:
Number of inspections performed
Inspection or quality scores
Number of incidents reported
Dollar amount of losses sustained
Number of insurance claims filed
Number of lawsuits filed
Number of serious or minor accidents
Number of lost workdays by employees
Insurance premium increases
Number of drills or training exercises correctly performed
Less tangible measures include guest satisfaction scores, improved employee
morale, and enhanced product marketability. The important point to remember
is that a program has been successfully designed for implementation only after an
appropriate evaluation component has been developed. Unless you know a program
has made a measurable difference, you may be lured into a false sense of security
about the program ’ s effectiveness.

ANALYZE THE SITUATION
PEGGI SHULKEY MANAGED A COMMISSARY for a large cafeteria company. Her facility
prepared food products for 75 company restaurants. Although her operation
did not have a tremendous number of work-related accidents, Peggi believed
the number of accidents could be reduced. To that end, she formed a safety
committee made up of employees and management, and charged them
with the task of developing a model program to reduce employee injuries.
The committee proposed the six-step plan presented here, along with their
rationale for each step.
1. Proper selection of employees.
An employee with a drug problem is dangerous; therefore, applicants
should be required to take a drug test before being hired. The applicant
must also execute a continuous authorization for drug testing, which permits
the employer to administer a drug test in the event of an accident.
2. Designation of a safety/injury coordinator.
The safety/injury coordinator will review past accident records and
implement programs to reduce situations that may result in accidents.
The safety coordinator will maintain a logbook of incidents, which each
department supervisor can review for incident trends.
3. Implementation of mandatory safety training.
Each employee will be trained in safety related to his or her job.
4. Increased awareness of safety.
Through the implementation of programs, games, and posters, employees
will be reminded to think intelligently and safely.
5. Implementation of incentive programs for safety.
To further encourage safety, rewards and incentives will be given to
employees who practice such behavior.
6. Measurement of results.
To be determined by the general manager.
1. What specific measurements might Peggi use to gauge the effectiveness
of the group’s plan?
2. How effective is training likely to be in reducing this particular threat to
safety?
3. Analyze the committee’s plan for thoroughness. Are there potential liabilities
that still need to be addressed?

ANALYZE THE SITUATION
KARIN PELLEY WAS EMPLOYED AS A DISTRICT MANAGER by Ron’s Roast Beef, a regional
chain of 150 quick-service restaurants serving sandwiches, soups, and soft
drinks. Most of the stores were located in shopping mall food courts or
strip malls. Ms. Pelley worked out of her home office, traveling to visit her
12 assigned stores on a regular basis.
Ms. Pelley communicated with the corporate office via telephone, fax
machine, and modem, all of which were installed in her home by Advance
Technology, a telecommunications company selected by Ron’s Roast Beef to
supply telecommunications equipment and services to employees. As part of
its contract with Ron’s Roast Beef, Advance Technology serviced the machines
used by Ms. Pelley in her daily work.
When Ms. Pelley’s modem stopped working one day, she contacted her
home office, which then called Advance Technology to request that a service
technician be dispatched to Ms. Pelley’s home. In the course of his visit,
the technician assaulted Ms. Pelley. The technician was later apprehended
by the police and convicted of felony assault, his third such conviction in
three years.
Ms. Pelley sued Advanced Technology, claiming negligent hiring. In addition,
her attorney submitted a demand letter to Ron’s Roast Beef, requesting
a $400,000 settlement from the company for negligence in contracting
its telecommunications services from Advance Technology. The attorney for
Ron’s Roast Beef refused to pay the claim stating that:
Ron’s had no control over the hiring practices of Advance Technology.
Ms. Pelley was prohibited by law from pursuing any injury claim against
her employer other than workers’ compensation, because the assault
occurred in Ms. Pelley’s “office.”
1. What responsibility did Ron’s Roast Beef have for providing a safe home
working environment for Ms. Pelley?
2. Will Ron’s Roast Beef be held liable for the damages suffered by Ms.
Pelley? Will Advance Technology be held liable?
3. What should Ron’s do in the future to avoid potential liability in situations
such as this?

Because the safety and security needs of different hospitality organizations vary
so widely, it is difficult to provide one all - purpose step - by - step list of activities
that should be implemented to minimize the chances of accident, injury, or loss.
That said, from a legal perspective your basic obligation is to act responsibly in the
face of threats to people and property. One way to analyze and respond to those
responsibilities is illustrated by a four - step safety and security management method
presented in Figure 1 .

Figure 1. Four-step safety and security management method.

Download (2.56 KB)

4-29-2009 05:49

Recognition of Threat
Safety and security programs generally start with the recognition of a need, that is,
a realization that a threat to people or property exists. Consider the case of Garth
Rivers. Garth is the manager of a popular pizza parlor that also serves beer and
wine. Over the past six months, Garth has had four guests and two employees
complain of vandalism to their cars. The damage ranged from scratched paint to
broken windows, and in it least one case, it appeared that the vandals attempted
to break into the car. Before these six incidents, Garth never had a problem. Now,
however, he realizes that he must act responsibly to serve the interests of his guests
and employees, and protect their property. A need for security has surfaced.
Figure 2 lists the most common areas of security concern in the hospitality
industry. The list is not intended to be exhaustive, but it does give some indication
of the vast number of areas within a facility that must be considered when developing
an overall safety and security program. Note the five major areas into which this
list is divided: guests, employees, property, facility assets, and crisis situations.

Figure 2 Areas of safety and security concern.

Download (16.78 KB)

4-29-2009 05:50

Program Development
Once a threat to safety or security has been identified, managers and security personnel
can develop an appropriate response to address that threat. Figure 3
details the many different components of an effective hotel safety and security
program, which would have to be addressed by management. Responses, or programs,
can take a variety of forms including:

1. Training for threat prevention
.
In many cases, the proper response to a safety and security threat is proper
training for employees. If, for example, employee safety is threatened
by a large number of back injuries caused by the use of improper lifting
techniques, training employees in proper lifting techniques could reduce
or eliminate that threat. Other examples include training room attendants
in the proper manner for disposing of bloody items found in rooms, teaching
cooks the proper way to use a meat slicer, or instructing employees and
guests in what should be done in the event of a fire emergency.

2. Increased surveillance and/or patrol
.
In some cases, the best response to a threat simply involves monitoring
the activities in a particular area with greater frequency. In the parking lot
problem just described, one of Garth ’ s best responses could be to increase
surveillance of the parking lot of his pizza parlor. Routine patrols carried out
by management, employees, an outside security firm, or the police may serve
as a significant deterrent to vandals.
Other safety and security threats can be addressed by installing video
cameras in public areas to record activity. Stairwells, halls, and storerooms
are appropriate areas for the installation of these devices. In many cases, the
presence of the camera itself can help deter crime. Video camera systems
can either record action to tape or simply display the activity of a specific
area in real time, with no recording of the events. In all cases, however, if a
camera is installed to view a specific problem area in a hospitality organization,
then that camera must be adequately monitored. Many organizations
have actually chosen to forgo the use of video cameras as a guest - safety tool
if they cannot be monitored, because the presence of the camera could give
the guest a false sense of security.
It is important to understand that an owner ’ s right to unlimited monitoring
and surveillance, even on his or her own property, is not absolute. In
today ’ s computer age, illegally monitoring the behavior of guests, and especially
that of employees, can dramatically increase an employer ’ s liability.

Figure 3 Elements of a hotel security program.

Download (8.56 KB)

4-29-2009 05:54

3. Systematic inspections
.
In some cases, holding a routine and comprehensive inspection of facilities
can help identify possible threats to safety and security. As a professional
hospitality manager, you will be expected to carefully monitor your facility ’ s
compliance with accepted standards of a safe and secure operation. It is important
that you not only regularly monitor your facility for compliance but also
document your efforts. Figure 4 is an example of a checklist that can be
used to do both: monitor compliance and document the effort. Many sophisticated
travel agency companies concerned about the safety of their clients,
as well as corporations concerned about the safety of their employees, have
developed their own safety and security checklists. As a manager, these can be
very instructive because they let you know what travel agents feel is important
in a facility they would recommend to their clients.

4. Modification of facilities
.
When the facility itself contributes to a threatening situation, that facility
may require modification. For example, worn carpets should be replaced
before a guest falls; sidewalk curbs should be painted if they are not visible
to pedestrians; and extra lighting might have to be added in specific areas to
increase safety and security. It is important to remember that facility defects
that have been recognized or should have been foreseen by management,
but not corrected, can be very damaging in the event of a lawsuit.

5. Establishing standard procedures
.
Routine policies and procedures can also serve as an effective response to
threats to safety and security. Consider the case of the hotel that offers guests
the use of a safety deposit box. Obviously, procedures should be in place to
ensure the security of the items placed on deposit with the hotel. In a similar
way, a restaurant must have appropriate procedures in place for counting and
depositing the cash it takes in on a daily basis. Periodic product inventories,
plate counts on buffet meals, and signing in and out of management keys are
all examples of standard operating procedures that directly impact the safety
and security of an operation.

Figure 4. Safety and security checklist.
(See Download Space: http://www.hotelmule.com/?uid-68-action-viewspace-itemid-1598[/url])

ANALYZE THE SITUATION
THE COMMODORE HOTEL was owned by the First Community Insurance Company,
and managed by Fieldstone Hospitality Management. After two separate guest
assaults occurred inside the hotel rooms, Fieldstone Management approached
First Community Insurance with the idea of either installing a closed circuit
video camera (CCVC) system in all hallways or increasing the lighting levels of
the hotel’s corridors. First Community Insurance authorized Fieldstone Management
to purchase a video surveillance system consisting of six cameras and
a central location to view them. The events shown by the cameras were not
committed to tape.
Late on the evening of February 6, Mrs. Cynthia Larson checked into the
Commodore and was assigned a room at the end of one of the hotel’s corridors.
As she attempted to insert her electronic key into the door lock, she was
assaulted.
Mrs. Larson sued both Fieldstone Management and First Community
Insurance, claiming that both companies’ failure to monitor their cameras was
a direct cause of her assault. In addition, she claimed that the cameras’ use was
deceptive, in that it gave her a false sense of security. As she stated, “The cameras
showed me the hotel cared about my security, and I wanted to stay in a
safe location.” According to timesheets provided under subpoena by the hotel,
an employee was assigned to view the cameras in the central location for an
average of two hours per night between the hours of 8:00 P.M. and 6:00 A.M.
The assault occurred at a time when no employee was monitoring the cameras.
The attorney for First Community Insurance stated that the company was
merely the owner of the hotel and not responsible for day-to-day management;
thus, is should not be held responsible for Mrs. Larson’s injuries. Fieldstone
Management maintained that it too should not be held responsible just
because the cameras installed were not monitored at all times. The presence
of the cameras themselves and electronic locks on their doors demonstrated
that the company used reasonable care in the protection of its guests.
1. Will First Community Insurance be held partially responsible for the
actions of Fieldstone Management?
2. Did Fieldstone Management use reasonable care in the installation and
operation of the camera system? Would it matter if the cameras were
recording to tape?
3. What could the hotel owners do in the future to help avoid a similar situation
with a guest?

Program Implementation
Once a hospitality firm has identified the threats to its operation, and designed a
safety and security program that addresses those threats, it must put the program
into action. Large hospitality facilities may have individuals specifically designated
for these tasks, while in smaller properties every employee may have implementation
responsibilities. Both large and small properties may find the need for temporary
or longer - term security assistance, which may be provided by a security guard
company. In all cases, local law enforcement officials should be a vital component
of a property ’ s safety and security program.

Safety and Security Departments

In a large hospitality facility, a safety and security department may exist. The department
head would ordinarily report to the general manager of the facility. Staff
members in the department would be responsible for routine duties such as patrolling
the facility for unauthorized people or suspicious activity, performing inspections,
assisting the police with crime reports, and serving as a liaison with insurance
carriers. In addition, the department might advise the general manager on topics
related to safety and security. The Educational Institute of the American Hotel and
Motel Association offers an excellent certification program for members of a safety
and security department.

Safety and Security Guards

If yours is a small facility, you may decide that it makes sense to contract with a
security guard company to hire a guard to implement all or a portion of your safety
and security program. Consider the case of Teddy Ross. Teddy manages a resort that
includes lodging, foodservice, and entertainment facilities. Teddy decides to renovate
his 200 hotel rooms. All of the furniture for the renovation is to be delivered
to Teddy ’ s facility at the same time, but it will be stored in tractor - trailers in his
parking lot until the building contractor finishes the room renovation. The process
is expected to take 10 weeks, with 20 rooms per week being furnished from the
items in the trailers. Because Teddy does not have the extra staff required to guard
the trailers at night, it might make good economic sense for him to contract with a
security company that could provide such a guard.
Generally it is the role of the security guard to:
1. Monitor the facility.
2. Report observations to management or the police if needed.
3. Intervene only if it can be done safely or to protect the life of a guest or
employee.
4. Record activities and findings.

Security guards are an excellent choice when additional help is needed, for
example, in the event of a large party or whenever management expects that additional
safety or security protection is warranted. They are not, however, a substitute
for a comprehensive and ongoing safety and security program. If such guards are to
be used, it is a good idea to insist that the security guard company:
1. Provide an acceptable indemnity/hold - harmless agreement.
2. Supply proof of liability insurance that names your operation as an additional
insured.
3. Demonstrate proof that it carries workers ’ compensation insurance.
4. Supply a copy of its hiring standards/procedures.
5. Draw up a written agreement detailing the specific services it will provide.

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